Dreaming of Landscapes Has Moved!

Leave a comment

Dreaming of Landscapes has moved to its new self hosted space. You can find it at binglestudios.com.

Advertisements

Seattle Downtown Medley

Leave a comment

On a chilly December day, I took my car to the Downtown Toyota Dealership to be serviced and took the day to sketch my impressions of Downtown Seattle. My experience was one of colossal towers and intimate details. I could never include the sky in my drawings because the buildings always dominated the page.

I also had trouble maintaining proportions in these drawings because the scene extended beyond my line of sight. This resulted in most of the skyscrapers being shortened in my sketches.

This drawing is a bird's eye view of Westlake Center Plaza. On the bottom is the top of the holiday merry-go-round and the monolithic entrance to the Cascading Water Monument. In the background, Century Square looms over the public space.

This drawing is a bird’s eye view of Westlake Center Plaza. On the bottom is the top of the holiday merry-go-round and the monolithic entrance to the Cascading Water Monument. In the background, Century Square looms over the public space.

I drew this sketch of the intersection of 4th and Pike from the counter of a Seattle's Best Coffee. This was fortuitous because Pike Street is the fiction location of Cafe Nervosa in the 1990s Seattle Sitcom Frasier.

I drew this sketch of the intersection of 4th and Pike from the counter of a Seattle’s Best Coffee. This was fortuitous because Pike Street is the fiction location of Cafe Nervosa in the 1990s Seattle Sitcom Frasier.

Sketches of Olympic Tower from the top of the Westlake Center Mall.

Sketches of Olympic Tower from the top of the Westlake Center Mall.

Olympic Tower was originally named the United Shopping Tower and housed a variety of retail businesses. Unfortunately, these businesses never experienced financial success due to the stock market crash shortly after the building’s grand opening in 1929. It was converted to offices in 1932 and has housed a variety of tenants since. The building was renamed the Olympic Tower in the 1980s when it was occupied by Olympic Savings.

Want to learn more about Downtown Seattle? visit here

Like this post and want to see more? Like, comment and/or follow.

All sketches on Dreaming of Landscapes are available as art prints for $15.

 

 

 

Another Urban Sketching Adventure

Leave a comment

A plane approaches Boeing Field over the Korean Central Baptist Church. Aircraft descending into Boeing Field ranged from prop planes to 737s.

This past weekend I joined the Seattle Urban Sketchers in Seattle’s Georgetown Neighborhood. Georgetown is a forgotten neighborhood wedged between I-5, Boeing Field and Highway 99. Currently one of Seattle’s centers of underground art and culture, Georgetown hosts a variety of galleries and stores such as the alternative comic publisher Fantagraphics Books’ store and the Elysian Brewery.

The neighborhood is crammed with historic brick buildings and craftsmen homes. Shown here is the Korean Central Baptist Church. The building caught my attention with its distinctive red cross and Korean characters. The church is housed in the top two stories of the building with business space beneath it. The building seems well care for as a pair of men were working to scrape graffiti from a window while I was sketching.

Korean Central Baptist Church inscription

Want to learn more about Georgetown? Visit the neighborhood website here.

Like this post and want to see more? Like, comment and/or follow.

10 Minute Bus Service Now Arriving in Seattle

1 Comment

Rapid Ride Shelter at the junction of California and Fauntleroy in West Seattle

This week’s sketch is of a new King County Metro Rapid Ride shelter at the intersection of California and Fauntleroy. I wish I had color at the time I made this sketch as the shelter is draped in red banners and signs. In addition to the eye candy, the station features an abundance of lighting, seating and signage.

Rapid Ride is Metro’s solution to their crowded and inefficient bus system. Buses will arrive every 10 minutes at peak times, 15 minutes off peak and 30 minutes after 10pm. This is achieved by spacing stops farther apart, creating dedicated bus lanes and coordinating stop lights with bus movements. Metro hopes this will alleviate bus congestion and encourage more bus ridership.

The final judgment on the  Rapid Ride system will have to wait for this fall when several lines open in Seattle. I remain doubtful that there is any way to circumvent Seattle’s rush hour traffic without building a transportation system separate from the existing road ways. However, if Rapid Ride can truly provided buses every 10 minutes during peak times it would be a welcome change to the currently sporadic 30 minute bus service to Downtown.

To learn more about King County’s Rapid Ride System visit here

To follow the development of the Rapid Ride System visit the Rapid Ride Blog

Like this post and want to see more? Take a moment to Like, Follow and/or Comment

Lenin Keeps Seattle’s Capitalist Swine In Check

Leave a comment

It is a little known fact that Seattle’s Fremont Neighborhood is the center of the universe. This explains the usual assortment of apparitions in the neighborhood. A VW Bug eating troll lives under the Aurora Bridge while a neon decorated ballistic missile vents steam and a group of unfortunate bus riders stand frozen waiting for the interurban.

Lenin strides into Seattle

The neighborhood’s oddest resident is a two storey tall statue of Lenin, captured in this week’s sketch. It is oddly appropriate that Lenin is surrounded by guns and flames as he keeps watch over the capitalist excesses of the neighborhood’s business district. Sculpted by Emil Venkov, the statue was installed in Czechoslovakia in 1988 and was removed shortly after the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. Lewis Carpenter, a teacher traveling in Czechoslovakia, discovered the statue and recognized it as Emil Venkov’s work. Wanting to preserve this piece of history, Carpenter bought the statue and transported it to his Issaquah home outside Seattle. Unfortunately, he never discovered a permanent home for the sculpture as he died shortly after returning to America. Carpenter’s family loaned the Lenin Statue to Fremont in the late 1990s in an attempt to find a buyer for this piece of Soviet memorabilia. No offers have been forth coming and Lenin remains on temporary display to this day.

Want to learn more about the unusual public art in Fremont visit here

Like this post and want to see more? Like, Follow, Comment

What I saw on 13th Street

Leave a comment

On a whim, I began this sketch while visiting my local coffee shop. We see the East Meets West Chinese restaurant and U.S. Bank on 13th Street, west of the University of Oregon campus, on a radiant Saturday morning. The 13thStreet Business District is home to a variety of businesses, including the Duck Store, Blue Heron Bicycles, Café Roma (where I drew this sketch), a plethora of restaurants and Frog (a campus character who sells homemade joke books). Apologies to the numerous businesses I am unable to list.  I like the trees and perspective inside the building, but I had trouble with the car. 

University of Oregon Street Fair

Leave a comment

This week’s sketch takes us to the University of Oregon Spring Street Fair. The biannual street fair hosts an eclectic mix of merchants from around Eugene. Regular merchants include a bonsai booth, poster stand and a food cart selling frozen cheese cake dipped in chocolate on a stick.

%d bloggers like this: